The Daniel Warn Factor: What can Bravo learn from the Blue Cross Blue Shield implementation? by Jon Hansen?

Posted on July 12, 2015

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“As CPO, led complete procurement transformation in less than 18 months including the design and adoption of a new purchasing policy, strategic sourcing process, vendor management program, implementation of P2P and eSourcing solutions, and creation of a procurement dashboard to monitor key performance metrics and target areas for continuous improvement. This resulted in an increase of spend under management from 40% to 90% further resulting in savings of 15% of total spend under management and a 10:1 procurement ROI.” – Daniel Warn – LinkedIn Profile

Experience – especially as a talk radio host – has taught me that the key to a good interview is preparation.

For me, being prepared means knowing as much, if not more, about the subject matter being discussed than my guest. Besides demonstrating respect for the guest, as well as the listeners who have taken time out of their day to tune in, it is through the preparation process that unique insights can be gained.

Often times these insights provide a perspective that is both new and revealing. Sometimes they establish a parallel point of reference that creates context for a particular story.

Let’s consider the possible interview with Bravo Solutions’ Daniel Warn regarding the use of the company’s solution in the Province of Ontario.

According to the information that I have received, the project was launched approximately 18 months ago – give or take a month.

As reported in my post yesterday, after 18 months 54 percent of all Ontario Ministry of Government and Consumer Services “MGS” tenders are being run through the Bravo platform. Given that MGCS were the ones who had selected Bravo, is 54 percent of their overall tender activity to this point in time, a satisfactory result?

Taking a further step back, and looking at the bigger picture, the MGCS bid activity represents just 1.2% of the total projects being tendered in Ontario. After 18 months it is, according to sources, this latter result that has led Bravo to allegedly employ strong arm tactics to “encourage” greater participation by organizations outside of MGS.

The question this raises – at least from where I am sitting, is whether the above percentages are in fact a problem.

Focusing on the MGCS business activity alone, what does 54 percent after 18 months really mean? Does this mean that the initiative is a success, or a failure?

This is why the proposed interview with Bravo’s Public Sector Vice President Daniel Warn, is of interest.

If we look closely at Daniel Warn’s LinkedIn profile, one might see the MGCS results as being a failure – or at least a disappointment.

success failure 3d concept

Between February 2010 and September 2012, Warn was the Chief Procurement Officer for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Rhode Island.

During his brief tenure, he led what was described as being a “complete procurement transformation in less than 18 months including the design and adoption of a new purchasing policy, strategic sourcing process, vendor management program, implementation of P2P and eSourcing solutions, and creation of a procurement dashboard to monitor key performance metrics and target areas for continuous improvement.”

This according to his profile, “resulted in an increase of spend under management from 40% to 90%” and, “savings of 15% of total spend under management and a 10:1 procurement ROI.”

By the way, and if you go back far enough, besides extensive experience on the client side of the table, Warn also spent a little bit of time as a consultant with CGI back in 2005.

In short, you obviously have someone who has a strong background and, a track record – at least with Blue Cross Blue Shield – in terms of complex project implementations.

Considering what he accomplished at Blue Cross Blue Shield in 18 months, would Warn consider the Ontario government implementation a success after the same amount of time? What are the differences between the two initiatives? How about the expectations going into the Ontario project and going forward today? How have they changed, if at all?

As with any developing story, there are more questions than answers.

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